Recognizing Race and Ethnicity Student Resources

Student Extras for Recognizing Race and Ethnicity, 2nd Edition, by Kathleen Fitzgerald

Available Resources

These student resources are designed to enhance the content of Recognizing Race and Ethnicity in order to help you plan your course and better engage students. If you have any suggestions on how to improve the book or the online resources, please contact Westview Press at westview.promotion@hbgusa.com.

Student Quizzes

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Chapter One

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Chapter Two

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Chapter Three

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Chapter Four

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Chapter Five

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Chapter Six

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Chapter Seven

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Chapter Eight

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Chapter Nine

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Chapter Ten

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Chapter Eleven

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Chapter Twelve

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Recommended Multimedia

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Chapter 1

Explore the Census Bureau’s online graphic showing US population statistics by race between the years 1790 and 2010. Make an argument that this is evidence that race is a social construction. What about the changing US racial categories surprised you the most? What are the most consistent patterns, and why do you think this is so?
http://www.census.gov/population/race/data/MREAD_1790_2010.html.

Listen to “A More Perfect Union,” the speech on race given by Barack Obama during his 2008 campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination. As you listen, think about the following questions: What points do you agree with? What do you disagree with? Does the speech make you think about race in a new way? Why or why not? Reflect on this speech and President Obama’s eight years in office. To what extent did President Obama affect race relations in the United States during his two terms? Give evidence to support your position.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWe7wTVbLUU

Check out the website for ERACE, the racial justice organization discussed in Box 1.2.
http://www.eracismneworleans.org.


Chapter 2

Check out the White Privilege Conference (WPC) website, particularly the WPC University, which offers online courses (some for credit) exploring issues of diversity, white privilege, and social justice.
http://www.whiteprivilegeconference.com/university.html.

Check out the website for the National Collegiate Dialogue on Race. If you find this interesting, ask your professor to sign your class up for the dialogue so that you can participate in it.
http://www.usaonrace.com/category/department/national-collegiate-dialogue.


Chapter 3

Race: Are We So Different? A project of the American Anthropological Association, this is a website and a traveling exhibit. If you do not get the opportunity to see it live, check it out online! Pay particular attention to their discussion of the science of race.
http://www.understandingrace.org/home.html.


Chapter 4

Slave narratives from the Federal Writers’ Project of 1936–38, Library of Congress. This site contains more than 2,300 first-person accounts of slavery and over five hundred photos of former slaves and is considered to be the most complete portrait of what life in slavery was like.
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/snhtml.

A Guide to the Mexican-American War—Virtual Programs and Services, Library of Congress. This digital collection of materials associated with the Mexican-American War includes maps, manuscripts, photos, government documents, and even sheet music.
http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/mexicanwar.


Chapter 5

Visit the website Without Sanctuary for photographs and postcards of lynching in America: http://withoutsanctuary.org.

For more information on the Freedman’s Bureau and the Jim Crow era, check out this PBS website: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/jimcrow/stories _events_freed.html.


Chapter 6

The Civil Rights Movement, Lesson Plan Library, Discovery Education. This website is useful for future teachers but also can be good for college students.
http://www.discoveryeducation.com/teachers/free-lesson-plans/the-civil-rights-movement.cfm.

Teaching a People’s History, Zinn Education Project. This website is loaded with material on social justice and racial/ethnic minority group history. In particular, check out the section on Asian American oppression and activism.
http://zinnedproject.org/teaching-materials/#filter_themes_top.


Chapter 7

Learn more about the 1946 case Mendez v. Westminster, in which Mexican Americans won a class action lawsuit to desegregate their schools in Orange County, California, at the following website: http://lpb.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/osi04.soc.ush.civil.mendez/mendez-v-westminster-desegregating-californias-schools/.

For more information on Native American education, see the website American Indian / Indigenous Education at http://www2.nau.edu/~jar/AIE/index.html. This website offers information on appropriate children’s books, organizations, projects, and programs, as well as curriculum material on Native American education. Additionally, it provides links to Native American studies programs across the country as well as a link to Indian experiences at the Carlisle Indian School. The links page is particularly useful: http://jan.ucc.nau.edu/~jar/IndianLinks.html.

To learn more about Asian American history and education, check out the Center for Educational Telecommunications website at http://www.cetel.org/index.html. This website lists curricular resources for K–12 Asian American education and links to the Association for Asian American Studies (AAAS) and the UCLA Asian American Studies Center, one of the largest teaching, training, and research programs on Asian Americans in the United States.

Check out a discussion of the Plessey v. Ferguson and Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decisions in Encyclopedia Britannica: https://www.britannica.com/event/Brown-v-Board-of-Education-of-Topeka https://www.britannica.com/event/Plessy-v-Ferguson.


Chapter 8

Mapping America: Every City, Every Block. The New York Times worked with data from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey to offer an interactive map of the racial demographics of every block in the United States. Go to this website and find out how racially segregated your city is: http://projects.nytimes.com/census/2010/explorer.

Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism. Sociologist James Loewen allows you to investigate whether your home town was a sundown town on his website: http://sundown.afro.illinois.edu/sundowntowns.php.


Chapter 9

The NAACP criminal justice department advocates for improved public safety in minority communities, better policing to attain that goal, less reliance on incarceration to solve social problems, and building trust between the criminal justice system and minority communities. It works toward sentencing reform, restoring voting rights for felons, supporting crime victims, and removing employment barriers for formerly incarcerated people. Check this out at: http://www.naacp.org/pages/criminal-justice-about.

Ban the Box Campaign. The Legal Services for Prisoners with Children organized a “ban the box” campaign designed to eliminate the question “Have you ever been convicted of a felony?” from applications for employment, housing, public benefits, and loans. Individuals who have served their time for a crime should not face a lifetime of discrimination for that crime. Check out the campaign at this website: http://www.prisonerswithchildren.org/our-projects/allofus-or-none/ban-the-box-campaign.

Students Against Mass Incarceration (SAMI). Founded in 2011 at Howard University, SAMI has since spread to other college campuses. Its objective is to dismantle the prison industrial complex by ending mass incarceration. SAMI works to educate the public about the prison industrial complex, help former prisoners overcome barriers to reentry, expose police brutality, and fight for the rights of political prisoners. Check out these websites for more information about this organization and how you can bring a chapter to your campus: https://lionlink.columbia.edu/organization/STUDENTSAGAINSTMASSINCARCERATION;
https://www.facebook.com/events/585302321481443/.

Death Penalty Information Center. This national nonprofit organization provides all the latest information on the death penalty in the United States, including fact sheets, a state-by-state database, information about upcoming executions, and resources for discussing the death penalty in the classroom: http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/.


Chapter 10

Code Switch. This NPR series on race, ethnicity, and culture featured an NPR story about Dumbfoundead, a Korean American rapper. http://www.npr.org/2013/04/18/177765541/korean-american-rapper-changing-the-face-of-hip–hop.

Asian Pacific Americans in Prime Time: Lights, Camera and Little Action. This website presents data from a study commissioned by the National Asian Pacific American Legal Consortium on the type, quality, and complexity of APIA television characters. http://www.advancingequality.org/sites/aajc/files/aajc_tv_06_2.pdf.

Life on the Reservation. This YouTube video is one of a half dozen about life on an Indian reservation, from the point of view of the residents. While Native American images are relatively invisible in mainstream media, many Native people have turned to user-generated-content sites like YouTube to present their lives and stories. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mV4QfYWcifM.

Whose Heritage? Public Symbols of the Confederacy. The Southern Poverty Law Center has compiled a list of all symbols of the confederacy, including a map. You can use this information to discover white supremacy on the landscape in your own community.
https://www.splcenter.org/20160421/whose-heritage-public-symbols-confederacy.


Chapter 11

The National Park Service offers a website with detailed information on “Ethnicity, Race and the Military.” Check out the website at: http://www.nps.gov/civilwar/ethnicity-race-and-the-military.htm.

Ending the Era of Harmful “Indian” Mascots. On this website, the National Congress of American Indians outlines their position on Native American mascots, paying specific attention paid to the controversy over the use of the slur “redskins” by the Washington Redskins football team: http://www.ncai.org/proudtobe.


Chapter 12

Southern Poverty Law Center. Want to know if you have organized hate groups in your community? Go to the following website and click on your state: http://www.splcenter.org/get-informed/hate-map.

Colorlines.org. Go to this website to keep up with the latest on race issues, immigration debates, and the Drop the I-Word campaign: http://colorlines.com/

“Inside Immigration Reform.” PBS News Hour on immigration: A Stanford University professor and Rochester Institute of Technology professor debate the economic value of immigrants. http://www.pbs.org/newshour/extra/daily_videos/could-more-skilled-immigrants-help-the-u-s-tech-industry/.

Further Readings & Recommended Films

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Academic Disciplines and Courses

  • African Studies
  • Art and Architecture
  • Education
  • European Studies
  • Philosophy
  • Psychology
  • Religion
  • Science and Advanced Math