Italian Renaissance Art


Laurie Schneider Adams

Second Edition • December 3, 2013 • 420 pages


Print ISBN: 9780813349022 • $95.00 USD$53.99 CAN

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Now thoroughly revised and updated throughout, featuring extended discussions of Mannerism and the expanding role of women in the visual arts and significant illustration program enhancements, Italian Renaissance Art is a readable, student-friendly, lavishly-illustrated introduction to one of the greatest periods of artistic genius in western history.

Art historian Laurie Schneider Adams opens the text with the late Byzantine work of Cimabue and concludes with the transition to Mannerism. The author presents the most important and innovative artists and their principal works, with a clear emphasis on selectivity and understanding. Italian Renaissance Art also focuses on style and iconography, and on art and artists, incorporating different methodological approaches to create a wider understanding and appreciation of the art.

Distinguishing features of the second edition include:

  • More than 400 images throughout the work, with over 300 in full-color. Over 50 images were changed from black and white to full-color for this edition. Illustration program now includes works by Correggio, Bronzino, and Pontormo.
  • Large format illustrations retained for readability and visual access by students. Design changes make the text more attractive and readable.
  • “Connections,” with thumbnail images of earlier works, show the historical continuity of the images. “Comparison” thumbnails have also been added for the purpose of comparing and contrasting later works with earlier ones.
  • New treatment of Mannerism and the expanding role of women in the visual arts. Coverage includes Lavinia Fontana, Sofonisba Anguissola, and Properzia de’ Rossi, and a new feature box discusses the role of Isabella d’Este as an influential art patron and humanist.
  • Maps, plans, and diagrams included throughout. Also features a historical chronology, a full glossary of art-historical terms, and a select bibliography.

Laurie Schneider Adams is Professor Emerita at John Jay College, City University of New York. At the Graduate Center she taught courses on Art and Psychoanalysis, Artists’ Biographies and Autobiographies, and the Italian Renaissance. She is the editor of the quarterly journal Source: Notes in the History of Art and the author of Art across Time, A History of Western Art, The Methodologies of Art, as well as numerous other works.

Part I: Precursors of the Renaissance
1. The Thirteenth Century
2. Trecento Precursors

Part II: The Quattrocento
3. Architecture and Sculpture in Florence: 1400–1430
4. Painting in Florence: 1400–1430
5. Painting in Florence: 1430–1460
6. Painting in Florence, II: 1430–1460
7. Sculpture and Architecture in Florence: 1430s–1460s
8. Developments in Siena, Rimini, and Pienza: 1400–1460
9. Developments in Umbria, the Marches, and Naples: 1400s–1460s
10. Sculpture and Architecture in Florence after 1450
11. Painting in Florence after 1450
12. Fifteenth-Century Developments in Verona, Ferrara, and Mantua
13. Developments in Late Fifteenth- and Early Sixteenth-Century Venice

Part III: The Cinquecento
14. Leonardo and Bramante: Late Fifteenth- and Early Sixteenth-Century Developments in Florence and Milan
15. Michelangelo and Raphael: The Late Fifteenth Century to 1505
16. Bramante, Michelangelo, Raphael: Developments in Rome to 1520
17. Venice in the Sixteenth Century
18. Michelangelo after 1520 and the Transition to Mannerism

“A clearly written, straightforward account of the story of Italian Renaissance art from its origins to Mannerism. The bulk of the material centers around central Italian painting, as it should, but other important, smaller centers are also included. The discussion of the various art forms is nicely balanced…. I especially liked the sidebars which add necessary material—historical, literary, technical and so forth—to the text without encumbering it…. This is a very good book which should furnish us with the new and useable text we have been waiting for. I would certainly use it in my classroom.” —Bruce Cole, Distinguished Professor, Chairman, department of the history of art, Indiana University

”This sensibly selective and well-written introduction to Italian Renaissance art covers the main centers throughout Italy and describes the major artists and their works from different critical and methodological points of view. The large-format illustrations make this text particularly useful.” —James Beck, Professor of Art History, Columbia University

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