Global Diplomacy

Theories, Types, and Models


Alison R. Holmes with J. Simon Rofe

First Edition • March 15, 2016 • 320 pages


Print ISBN: 9780813345529 • $45.00 USD$58.50 CAN

Ebook ISBN: 9780813345536 • $29.99 USD$38.99 CAN

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In a field dominated by the history and practices of Western states, Global Diplomacy expands the mainstream discourse on diplomacy to include non-Western states and states in all stages of development. By presenting a broader view of this crucial institution, this exciting text cultivates a more global understanding of the ways in which diplomacy is conducted in the world today and offers a new perspective on the ways it may continue to develop in the future.

This book presents:

  • A brief introduction to diplomatic practice, the classic diplomatic narrative, and different theories of diplomacy.
  • An exploration of diplomacy over time and place through four types of diplomacy—political, cultural, economic, and military—discussed by guest authors who are experts in their respective fields.
  • Three new models of diplomatic interaction—Community, Transatlantic, and Relational—illustrated through the examples of the European Union, UK and US relations, and the rising powers of India and China.

Alison R. Holmes is assistant professor and program leader of international studies at Humboldt State University. She earned her PhD in international relations at the London School of Economics and has been awarded fellowships at Oxford University and Yale University. Before starting her academic career, Holmes worked in the UK for 21 years, including ten years with the third party of British politics, the Liberal Democrats, running both their 1992 and1997 General Election Campaigns. Just prior to leaving the UK, Holmes was speechwriter and communications advisor to the US Ambassador to the UK.

J. Simon Rofe is senior lecturer in diplomacy and international studies in the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, SOAS, at the University of London. His research interests focus on US foreign relations and diplomacy in the twentieth century, with a specific focus on presidential post-war planning. He is the author of Franklin Roosevelt’s Foreign Policy and the Welles Mission. Rofe is also co-series editor of Key Studies in Diplomacy and is on the editorial board of the journal Diplomatic History.

Acknowledgments

Introduction
ALISON HOLMES, Humboldt State University

Terminology
Structure of the Text
Global Diplomacy

PART I THEORIES OF DIPLOMACY

1 Diplomatic Practice
J. SIMON ROFE, SOAS, University of London

‘Traditional’ Power and Diplomacy
Fit for Purpose: Process of Diplomacy
Diplomats, Embassies, and Ministries of Foreign Affairs
Tactics through Time
Technology and Diplomacy
Conclusion
References and Further Reading

2 The Classic Story of Diplomacy
J. SIMON ROFE, University of London/SOAS

The State of the State
Treaty of Westphalia
Sovereignty
‘New’ Diplomacy
Classic Theories of Diplomacy
Conclusion
References and Further Reading

3 A Different Kind of ‘New’ Diplomacy
ALISON HOLMES, Humboldt State University

‘New’ Diplomacy and Its Problems
Diplomacy without the (Westphalian) State
Alternative Views
English School
Revised English School
Sources of Power
Alternative States and Diplomacies
Conclusion
References and Further Reading

CROSS SECTION 3.1 Diplomacy Timeline

PART II TYPES OF DIPLOMACY AND DIPLOMACIES OF PLACE

Introduction
ALISON HOLMES, Humboldt State University

Time and Its Impact on Views of History
Diplomatic Practice
Types over Time Diplomacies of Place
References and Further Reading

4 Diplomacy and Politics
KENNETH WEISBRODE, European University Institute

Introduction
A Broader Definition
Transformations
Order and Governance
The Shape of Diplomacy
References and Further Reading

CROSS SECTION 4.1 The Mandala, Politics, and Territory

5 Trade, Diplomacy, and the Evolving Global Economy
GEOFFREY ALLEN PIGMAN

Introduction: Millennia of International Trade as Diplomacy
The Diplomacy of Trade Liberalization
The Institutionalization of Economic Diplomacy
Judicialization and Future Transformations
References and Further Reading

CROSS SECTION 5.1 Byzantium: Trade and Culture

6 Cultural Diplomacy
GILES SCOTT-SMITH, Leiden University

Definitions
Signposts
Purposes and Application
References and Further Reading

CROSS SECTION 6.1 China Zhou Dynasty: Culture and Confucius Meet Military Might

7 Defense and Intelligence Diplomacy
ANDREW M. DORMAN AND MATTHEW R. H. UTTLEY, King’s College, London

Introduction
The Nature and Character of Defense and Intelligence Diplomacy: Simplicity and Complexity
Defense and Intelligence Diplomacy in Peacetime
Defense and Intelligence Diplomacy in Crises
Defense and Intelligence Diplomacy in Times of War and Conflict
Defense and Intelligence Diplomacy in the Context of Domestic Politics
References and Further Reading

CROSS SECTION 7.1 India: Chandragupta and Chanakya, Military Strategy and Political Power

8 The European Tradition of Diplomacy: Alliances, Coalitions, and Professional Diplomats
SHAUN RIORDAN, International College Spain, Madrid

The Diplomatic Corps
Network and Coalition Disruption
National Security Strategy
Key Events in the Evolution of European Diplomacy
Conclusion
References and Further Reading

Conclusion
ALISON HOLMES, Humboldt State University

References and Further Reading

PART III MODELS OF DIPLOMACY AND GLOBAL STATES

Introduction
ALISON HOLMES, Humboldt State University

References and Further Reading

9 The European States-System: The Community and Transatlantic Models
ALISON HOLMES, Humboldt State University

Where is ‘the West’?
The European Community and the Community of Europe
Transatlantic Diplomacy
From Europe to Everywhere?
Conclusion
References and Further Reading

10 A Relational Model of Diplomacy
ALISON HOLMES, Humboldt State University

Structure: The hegemony of hierarchy and the possibility of heterarchy
The Indian and Chinese States-Systems Combine In a Relational Model
Politics, Culture, Economics, and the Military in the Relational Model
Features of the Relational Model
The Relational Model and ‘Classic’ Theories
Strengths and Weaknesses of the Relational Model
Asia vs.? Europe
Conclusion
References and Further Reading

Conclusion
ALISON HOLMES, Humboldt State University

Glossary
About the Guest Authors
Index

“[A] challenging but rewarding read.” –The Foreign Service Journal

Global Diplomacy is a fascinating account of an important development on the diplomatic stage: the cast of characters is lengthening, and states are no longer guaranteed the starring roles.”
—David Clinton, Baylor University

Global Diplomacy is both challenging and rewarding. The essential character of what diplomacy does is unchanging, the authors argue, but how it is done, and by whom are both greatly dependent on the contexts of time and place in which diplomacy is undertaken.”
—Paul Sharp, University of Minnesota Duluth

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